• 7 months ago

    insomnia

    I've only gotten about a total of 10 hours of sleep in the past week. Sometimes i take Ambien but that doesn't even help. Anyone have any suggestions or experience this problem?

Responses

  • 7 months ago

    RE: insomnia

    seek professional help a therapist my help get a sleep study done
  • 7 months ago

    RE: insomnia

    Dear insomnia, you are not alone. I rarely sleep. If I do it is in the middle of the afternoon when I pass out from exhaustion but I am up all night, every night. It is impossible to fall asleep and just as hard to stay asleep. Ambien didn't work for me either but Klonopin did, although benzodiazepams have a bad rap in that they can be addictive. Ask your Dr. for meds. Good luck!
  • 7 months ago

    RE: insomnia

    Unlike LB above, I'd say look to pharmaceuticals only as a last resort, and only on the advice of your doc, and use them only to treat underlying medical issues that are causing your insomnia.

    Otherwise, why bother? You won't be treating the true underlying basis for your sleeplessness.

    Most insomnia is caused by some combination of bad sleep habits and excessive worry about the idea of sleep. Both of those can be fixed without drugs.
      • 7 months ago
        My apologies insomnia. I thought you were actually experiencing the neurological disease of RLS.
  • 6 months ago

    RE: insomnia

    Hi there!

    You asked if anyone has any suggestions, and actually, I do. lol :)

    Be warned, though, you and possibly anyone else reading this might think this suggestion is not only impossible to achieve, but a bunch of BS!.

    So on that note, here's my suggestion based on my own experience. I discussed this with a former therapist and a Psychiatrist just to see if they thought it was something irrational and/or unattainable. They both grinned and nodded with excitement that I had figured this out and it was working for me. (That probably came out arrogant, but I don't meant it to be - just saying.)

    What do you think the #1 reason is that people get insomnia? It's not the only reason, but it's the primary and most common - the reason is that we don't turn off the "conversations" in our head. Period! We lay in bed and start thinking about something we are worrying about, or the project that needs to be complete by the end of the day tomorrow, or the person from 10 years ago who made you angry....and the list goes on. These are not just the simple thoughts that pop in our head, but the thoughts that turn in to self-conversations wherein one topic leads to another, and to another. A person simply CANNOT sleep when those "conversations" are taking over our mind!

    So how can we make it stop? Is it possible to make it stop? The answer to that is a resounding YES!

    I've had insomnia for at least 26 years, and I took sleeping pills for a majority of that time. Not daily, but almost daily. My insomnia was medication induced so I figured that I was doomed. I mean, if insomnia is a side effect of my medication and I can't stop taking that medication, then I guess I'm stuck with insomnia, right? NO!

    I started to think about why I have insomnia other than medication, and the answer was obvious - I can't turn my brain off. So I followed it through and thought, "So if conversations in my head is what's keeping me awake, then I need to somehow learn to stop with the conversations." So easy! NOT! I am a thinker who has a hard time turning it off! How the heck am I supposed to turn my mind off so I can sleep? I had no idea, but I came up with a system that worked for me.

    As soon as my head hits the pillow, I tell myself that it's not time for conversations, but it's time to sleep. Obviously, none of us can totally turn off our thoughts, but we CAN stop the "conversations." As soon as I start taking a thought further, I force myself to STOP. Two seconds later it or another thought comes up, and I do the same - I stop myself from carrying on that "conversation" in my head. For me, the first few nights was difficult because I also stopped taking sleeping pills, but after those few days, I got better and better at it until I was able to get to sleep every night without a sleeping pill! Some nights were harder than others and I sometimes I have to be more disciplined to do it, but it works! Therapy that is specifically for insomnia called Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - Insomnia (CBT-I) goes along the same premise, though it gives more ideas and tools of how to do it.

    Now that I"ve rambled on enough, I would give it a try. It won't be easy at first, and in fact, may feel impossible; but if you can somehow make yourself discipline yourself past the initial part of it, you may find yourself getting better at it. Don't expect it to happen overnight, but it really does work. Not just for me, but the principle is universal.

    Sleep well :)

    Debbie
  • 6 months ago

    RE: insomnia

    You can retrain your brain. Here are some steps: Sleep restriction, no naps, daily exercise, and do breathing exercise often in day time and before going to bed. Even if you don’t sleep couple of days, do not take naps and stay fixed with your sleep schedule. Your sleep will buildup and you will sleep. It may take sometimes but it will work. Importantly, don’t feed your brain that “I can’t sleep.” Instead repeat positive statement, such as you can sleep and say it to your brain over and over. When the negative thoughts come, recognize it and take a deep breath feel the emotion and let the thought go. Don’t dwell on thoughts because our brain and body wants that same addition and it will force negative thoughts, but as you stay in present moments and repeat positive mantra, then it will lose its power.
  • 6 months ago

    RE: insomnia

    You can retrain your brain. Here are some steps: Sleep restriction, no naps, daily exercise, and do breathing exercise often in day time and before going to bed. Even if you don’t sleep couple of days, do not take naps and stay fixed with your sleep schedule. Your sleep will buildup and you will sleep. It may take sometimes but it will work. Importantly, don’t feed your brain that “I can’t sleep.” Instead repeat positive statement, such as you can sleep and say it to your brain over and over. When the negative thoughts come, recognize it and take a deep breath feel the emotion and let the thought go. Don’t dwell on thoughts because our brain and body wants that same addition and it will force negative thoughts, but as you stay in present moments and repeat positive mantra, then it will lose its power.