• 8 months ago

    Migraine

    Dealing with migraine for 55 years. Anyone find changes in weather the chief culprit? Three day before it rains, a major headache takes hold and has me bedriddenuntil after it rains. HELP!

Responses

  • 8 months ago

    RE: Migraine

    I definitily have terrible changes before rain. Yesterday I was dizzy and out of it. Today it rained. I have terrible migraines and they react to weather, stress, smells and lights.
      • 1 month ago
        I assume you have tried the “Tristan’s”. GO with a steroid dose pack. Definitely works for me.
      • 1 month ago
        I do too. There is not too much I can do but lie down and try to rest.
  • 8 months ago

    RE: Migraine

    Yep, my back pain gets worse day before rain as well as normally fine elbows & knees! My migraines are not as regular or debilitating as they were in my mid to late 30's, but I do still get them about twice per year & they have always been sensitive to the barometer showing air pressure. It's usually at about 30 when my pain is the worst. The RX nose spray, a mild narcotic pain reliever & a small dose of xanax worked best for me after trying multiple drug combinations from my Emory neurologist.
  • 8 months ago

    RE: Migraine

    Yes, always. I have suffered with migraines since I was 16 yrs old...so over 50 years now and I have had 3 disk spinal fusion and arthritis in the knees & ankles. Rainy & cold days are absolutely miserable, like the flu without the fever. 30 years ago, doctors didn't believe in preventative approach to migraines...always after the fact when it takes 3 days + to recover from a massive migraine. So now, if I feel the symptoms as with an approaching storm or barometer drop, I take my migraine med to nip it in the bud or to at least moderate the pain to manageable. Now with the opioid epidemic, doctors are getting more hesitant to be proactive...I am fortunate to have had the same doctor for 30 years and knows that I am responsible with pain management at the ripe old age of 60....it's a shame that people with chronic pain now also have to suffer because of abusers.
      • 7 months ago
        So true about the opioids. The addicts have hurt us with chronic migraines.
      • 2 months ago
        While opioids are terrific for acute pain (less than 3 months) they are a terrible solution for chronic pain (pain constantly occurring longer than 3 months) for most people. There are several reasons for this. First, continued use build up a tolerance to the drug so the dosage must be increased to obtain the same level of relief. This is different from addiction. Next, long term use of opioids generally makes most people more sensitive to pain with the result being that lower levels of pain start to hurt more. Opioids also replace the bodies natural pain killers so that the body either slow downs or stops making them. The effect of this is also to generally increase pain levels. As with all medications, individuals react differently to the same medication so while the above refers to the majority of people there are exceptions.
  • 8 months ago

    RE: Migraine

    I have also had Migraines since my youngest son was born. He's now 48. My Neurologist got me started on Bo Tox injections which have been fantastic. In the year I have been receiving the injections. every 3 months, I have had only one Migraine. It is worth asking your Neurologist or GP.
      • 7 months ago
        I know all the latestthanjs for the input. So glad you are helped by Botox. It doesn't do anything for me. My problems r the weather. I sways know two days Head of time when it's going to rain. I am down as often as three days when a front is coming. Lately, I was helped by a steroid dose back. Maybe that will help someone else too. Glo2468
      • 7 months ago
        Botox just doesn't work for me, just on a " wim" I took 4 steroids from a dose pack I had from an infection and it WORKED! Unfortunately, the doctor won't perscribe without seeing me. Those of us with migraine know how impossible it is to get out of bed and go to the doctors office with a migraine. So, I saved some from the script and am optimistic that I can "kill" it before it drags into days. I was hoping that as I got older they would Lessen or disappear but not so lucky. I am 78. If anything, with the weather change on the horizon, they last longer. I think the weather in the north east has gotten worse ( maybe more humid)....Anyone notice a change in the weather from years past? I could be a regular weatherman!
      • 6 months ago
        I too, have been dealing with Migraines for 50+ years. I had hoped they would go as I got older, but I am not that lucky. Barometric pressure is a huge trigger for me. I agree, I can predict the weather better than any weather man! My best treatment was Botox. But, my insurance does not cover it anymore. I admit I was feeling like it was only me suffering all these years with this debilitating condition. Seeing the many posts from folks battling the issue as long as I have was enlightening. I hope one day they find a cure or treatment that is more reliable then the current meds are. I am told accupuncture helps but have yet to find an accupuncturist in my area.
  • 6 months ago

    RE: Migraine

    I find the same to be true, I only get a migraine 1 day or 12 hours before rain.
  • 2 months ago

    RE: Migraine

    Intense heat causes me terrible migraines with nausea. I am prescribed Zofran 8mg to help treat this. For me, Zofran (generic: Ondansetron) is by far the most effective drug for nausea.
  • 2 months ago

    RE: Migraine

    I've had migraines since I was 5 years old and am now in my 70's. Mine are triggered by weather/hay fever and bright lights. A few years ago I read in the Reader's Digest magazine that cold and sinus meds (such as Advil cold and sinus) works when prescriptions and other things don't. You have to ask the pharmacist for it and sign because druggies mix it with other things and cook it to make meth. In it's present form it isn't meth and doesn't require a prescription. I take it at the onset of a migraine and within half an hour I am OK again.
      • 1 month ago
        Thank you. I found by accident that when on an antibiotic, AND steroid dose pack, I do not get a migraine!
  • 1 month ago

    RE: Migraine

    The weather affects mine too. I shouldn't say that I'm glad, so I will say that I see that I'm not alone being in my late 60's & still getting the dreaded things.
  • 1 month ago

    RE: Migraine

    Have you ever try medical marijuana my auntie Use it for her migraine and it works miracles talk to your doctor
      • 1 month ago
        I have considered medical Marijuana but have not asked the doctor for a prescription for it. I did buyCBD capsules but have not found them to be helpful for my migraines. I don't know if I have the correct dosagefor the level of painI get with a Migraine. Right now, I find my Fioricet and a dark room are my go to relief. I avoid using the Fioricetfor a headaches that is not too painful. I only use it for those horrendous days that occur and are difficult to deal with.
  • 1 month ago

    RE: Migraine

    Neurofeedback has been very effective for migraines...look for a BCIA certified individual in your area.
  • 1 month ago

    RE: Migraine

    Migraine, with its subtypes, seems to me to be a general symptom classification of a type of headache, one that generally occurs on one side of the head at a time, rather than a particular illness. It also seems to be one of the least understood neurological illnesses that occur. It may be one of the most misunderstood neurological illnesses as well. Many of the treatments for migraines seem to have been based on trial and error of treating the symptoms rather than serious scientific research as to the root causes of migraines of which there may be several. Symptoms do include physiological changes such as blood vessel changes, blood pressure changes, visual effects, muscle reactions, and other neurological changes. Given this information, it is not particular surprising that the number of treatments and medications available seem to be endless.

    While migraines are often classified by belonging to certain groups or subtypes, which often respond to a class of particular treatments, the resolution of what works for an individual often tends to be unique for that person. What works for one may work for others, or not. Treatments that worked previously for an individual may gradually or suddenly stop working for no specific reason.

    That is why most migraine sufferers find themselves having to add a second occupation to their skill set - that of being a medical detective - sort of a Sherlock Holmes for migraines. This requires one to be their own advocate in search for the treatment that will be effective in mitigating their migraines. This requires both patience and time and is often fraught with seeming endless failures.

    To be successful there are a few basic principles that I believe should be adhered to:

    - In regard to any treatment or medication that involves doing something or taking something you would not normally do or take, ALWAYS discuss it with a licensed health professional who has a background of migraine experience before trying it. Depending on your overall health, what might be safe for someone else, may not be safe for you.

    - NEVER give up trying, as the effective treatment just might be the next one you try. Treatments are always being invented and changing. Sometimes a group of several treatments or medications, or a combination of both may result in success.

    - Do the research and become an informed patient before trying any medication or treatment. Know the potential side effects and fully understand the risks of any treatment, as well ask what it might cost and what other things the treatment or medication might conflict with.

    - Give the treatment time to work. This is very important as some treatments or medications take weeks to months to become effective. Conversely if a treatment stops working for a significant period of time, it becomes pointless to continue to use it without any changes or investigating alternatives.

    - Religiously follow the directions of the treatment or medication. It is unlikely to work if you don't use it as it is supposed to be used.

    - A little skepticism is good. But completely rejecting a treatment simply because it sounds weird or just seems to simple or non-standard can be to your detriment. It may be worth trying PROVIDING it can do no harm. Often a little research or getting a second opinion with allow you to make an informed decision.

    I was very skeptical when it was suggested I try mindfulness exercises by a licensed health professional experienced in pain management. But since it could do no harm I tried it anyway, while trying not to prejudge. To my surprise and relief, it has worked to a point that it has become a useful tool, among others, for mitigating my chronic migraines.

    Currently there is no single medication or treatment available that will work for all migraine patients, that I am aware of - i.e. miracle drug or treatment, that will work for all who suffer from this maliady. If someone promises you that they have a treatment or medication that will absolutely cure you of migraines, without giving you a proper exam and knowing your previous migraine history, they are most likely giving you false hope, and are are more interested in your wallet than your migraine. Historically this was once labeled 'Snake Oil'.

    As you read through this discussion board, you will come across many treatments and medications that have worked for others. That does not mean they will work for you. One the other hand, after a discussion with a licensed health profession, if you feel like trying one of them, and research indicates it poses minimal risk to your overall health, lifestyle and wallet, the worst that can likely happen is that it won't work or it might temporarily increase your migraines while using it. If it does, you only need to stop it to get back where you where before.

    That said you should never suddenly stop a treatment or medication without first discussing it with a licensed health professional, in particular with certain medications, as some of them if suddenly stopped can result in serious psychological, or physical side effects.

    Finally you need to believe - and keep on believing, that somewhere out there, their is a course of treatment that ultimately will mitigate the impact of migraines on your everyday life. All YOU have to do is find it. While not an easy task, it is doable, as so many others have sucessfully found out.

    The above content is based on my own experience of having to deal with migraines all my life and should not be considered to be professional medical advice.
  • 1 month ago

    RE: Migraine

    This may sound crazy but Migraines can be linked to leaky gut syndrome. I take and sell some products that focus on gut health and they work wonders. Candida in the gut is the cause. I have a friend who suffered from Migraines all the time, she started taking these products and hasn't had one since.. Feel free to email me at hkidd1230@gmail.com for more info :)