• over 1 year ago

    Chronic Pain

    I too am one of a million people suffering from chronic pain. There has been much in the media about the opiate crisis. Since I am under a pain management doctor's care and take opiates for chronic pain, I am very concerned. The media states how many people are dying each day from opiate overdoses, but I never hear about how many people, under a pain management doctor's care are dying from overdoses. I take my meds as prescribed and I take them for my pain, not to get high. I have been taking opiates for the past 11 years.

    I live in Florida which has some of the strictest laws covering opiate prescriptions. For a time after restrictions were put in place, finding a pharmacy to fill your Rx was difficult. Many pharmacies were afraid to fill narcotics or the pharmacy would be out of the meds due to DEA allowing pharmacies to carry only a certain amount of the drugs.

    There are many judgmental people, both in and out of the medical community believing chronic pain suffers do not need pain medication. I have had physical therapy, TENS unit, steroid injections, talk therapy, support groups, every over the counter pain aid on the market and finally a 12 hour reconstructive surgery on my cervical and thoracic spine. The surgery failed and pain continued.

    Pain medications help me tremendously, but they are not a cure all, I still have pain. I am thankful for my life, and pain medications help me live a good life. Without pain meds, I don't know how I could endure agonizing pain day after day without any relief.

Responses

  • over 1 year ago

    RE: Chronic Pain

    This is the bravest and factual post on pain management and the ways opioid pain medications help chronic pain sufferers live some kind of meaningful life. I have been on some kind of opioid pain medication since my near fatal car accident 15 years ago. I have never overdosed, gone on to heroin, had Jonesing DTs, or sold my drugs.

    The reality is millions of these medications are written annually, according to the CDC. Overdose deaths directly related to pain med's annually have never topped 36,000. That means millions of chronic pain patients are not abusing, or dying from safely and professionally managed pain treatment from opioid pain meds. The numbers don't lie. The stigma does.
      • over 1 year ago
        You are exactly right. As you can see in this tread, there are many of us who take our meds as prescribed and do not have any problems with them. Given by a careful Dr in the correct amounts and taken properly they can be a great help to those of us who suffer from chronic pain. People looking to sell or seek out these drugs do so with intentions of abusing them before they even go to a Dr. And most likely seek out those Dr's known to give out scripts to anyone. These drugs don't likely kill or cause problems for many who really need them, and really become dangerous when taken by those who don't, along with some other combinations of drugs and/or alcohol. I find it ironic that alcohol is almost never mentioned as a problem when used with these drugs, and for the number of people it kills every year, whether directly or indirectly. Yet people will just judge the medication or the patient and say that it leads to people using heroin or some other dangerous addictive street drug. The majority of those who move onto those drugs are the people looking to get high in the first place or the ones who are abusing them and have them taken away. There are those who are unfortunate enough to have their scripts taken away without a good reason that will turn to the street if they can't deal with their pain and feel they have no other choice.
        It's unfortunate this has fallen into the hands of those playing politics that will do or say anything to get re elected. I'd tell them to walk a day in my shoes, but I wouldn't wish my pain on anyone.
      • over 1 year ago
        That's like 100/ day or 4 plus/hour. To me that's a lot. Way more than dying from smoking pot.
      • over 1 year ago
        sorry but od the most deaths are from someone under doctors care that is from the cdc there are lots of folks who take these meds who do not need them some one in this thread said that most of the people in his support take the drugs for the high not for the pain killing effects our leader in my group asked the same question of us yesterday the answers was the same as the other poster's the saddest fact is how we lie to ourselves that we are not misusing our med that one extra pill drinking and/or toking with them be honest with yourself yes i take pain meds have for over 40 years yes i have misused them in the name of pain relief and interesting fact at higher doses opioids cause a greater sensitivity to pain myself I am going to try pot my tolerence has gotten too high 200 mgs of oxy a day again we can argue about this all day but the fact remains that we all are going to have to find other ways of relief the goal of the USA gov is a complete and total ban on all opioids meaning that everyone suffers even the terminally ill
  • over 1 year ago

    RE: Chronic Pain

    I am also one of the forgotten ones in Florida. It makes me upset that all the media and people report on are the overdoses and misuse of the drugs that save our lives everyday. I wonder how many older people would give up if they could not get the meds that save our lives everyday. They do not want to report on these facts . I have been in pain management for four years and now they have diagnosed my lung cancer and trying to cut back on my medicines to Tylenol # 3 . I guess my pain has gone down since it is cancer.
  • over 1 year ago

    RE: Chronic Pain

    You Americans are funny!!!!! You take the most drugs in the world both legal and illegal and wonder where the drug problem comes from?
  • over 1 year ago

    RE: Chronic Pain

    I too have chronic pain. I have also taken NSAIDs that resulted in 2 GI bleeds. I've hade cortisone injections. They no longer help. Therapy, surgery, and visualization, to name a few more, do not provide me with any relief from the pain I have every single day. It even interrupts my sleep. I can understand why a person that is unable to get legal opiates may turn to heroin. I have been using opiate medication for four years. It helps me to actually live instead of just existing. I'm 57 years old. I've had more than 40 surgical procedures. Look fine on the outside. It's difficult for any person to understand that I am not fine. It concerns me a great deal when I consider I could be cut off from the oxycodone. It's hard to know for sure what I would do. I don't like to think I would turn to heroin. In reality I could very well take that road. I don't judge any human being. I don't want to be judged. I worked in a clinical laboratory and an RN. I spent many years caring for others. Now that I need care I have found the days of caring about the person are coming to an end. Our government has its nose where it doesn't belong. Our government is yet taking away each individual's right to be treated by what our doctor believes is best. Our government is imposing a "one size fits all" treatment plan. The fall-out is going to result in far more deaths than there are now. Let doctors do their job.
  • over 1 year ago

    RE: Chronic Pain

    Well said.
  • over 1 year ago

    RE: Chronic Pain

    Hello I too deal with pain on a daily basis. I have been on pain pills for almost 17 years. I am I feel on a low dose of 40 mg oxycodone a day. I wanted to know what is the dose drs give for your pain. My entire spine is in real bad shape. Four surgeries on my L4-5 and upper spine surgery too and now it looks like a thoracic spine surgery in the near future. Thanks for any help you can give me.
    jujube
      • over 1 year ago
        I am only allowed 40mg/day. I have used CBD and it does help. I do not use the synthetic CBD. I only use the Organic CBD. I wish you well.
  • over 1 year ago

    RE: Chronic Pain

    I, too, had beeen on opiates (Oxycodone and OxyContin XR) for quite a number of years, 14 to be exact. I have taken from 5 of 30 mg Oxycodone to 3 of the 30 mg OxyContin XR a day, and below, during my 14 year period. I LOVE my pain clinic doctor, as he truly cares about my pain, and has always worked with me to control it. At one time, I had Fentanyl lozenges made with 800 mg of the med in them. I am not sure if it was in the whole 24 pack, or individual, but they did help me deal with the horrific pain I was enduring during that time period. I have told you about this so you can see that I have been on a lot of medication through my years of being a pain patient, and am at this time, not concerned with any federal, state, or local mandates, or compliance suggestions..

    Why?? Because of the new compliance suggestions, which were not considered to be mandates by the CDC, some states have started to limit opiod access to their pain patients, as well as lowering patients' medication milligrams, along with reducing the amount pharmacies could have on hand at one certain time. (This information was taken from the magazine, "Practical Pain Management," of which I receive no mometary gain, but want you to be aware of.) Dr. Forest Tenant is a wonderful pain doctor and editor of this magazine, which you can read online, at practicalpainmanagement.com. My pain doctor reads this magazine religiously, and sees what many states are doing to pain patients and their pain medication. As a result, he feels that all states will be taking some actions to reduce opiod pain medications in the near future. Because of this, he begin lowering my opioid dosage a little each month. He felt as if my home state of Alabama's opioid crisis was so great, they soon would be passing laws laws prohibiting the use of many of the opioid pain medications. We decided the chance of this happening in my state was so great, that I needed to be off opioids, or in the future, possibly be forced to do so in a sudden, horrific withdrawal. He did not want that to happen, so he started lowering the amount of opiod medication I took, down to a level that I was able to switch from an opiod medication, to a Butran patch, an opiod antagonist, without any problem with withdrawal. The patch has been an adjustment, with some physical symptoms, such as headache and nausea for a few days, but other than that IT IS WONDERFUL!!! After adjusting my dosage to one that was strong enough to control my pain, I am absolutely thrilled to be on this patch. There is no longer the fear of my state being able to pass a law, and my opioids no longer being available to me. I actually feel better than I have in years, I have more energy, and it seems to be a more well-rounded medication that helps me 24/7 rather than waiting until morning to take a med, and having to wait an hour or so before I could function because the drug had to have time to get into my body. Look up this med (patch), and see what you think. Right now, I am on the 15 mg patch, changing once weekly, and still on the Oxycodone 15 mg, 3x daily, but we are continuing to lower this dosage as we gradually up my patch strength. We eventually want me to only take one 15 mg Oxy each day. If the patch continues to do it's job, I see this as something I can definitely do.

    I wish you the best, as I do understand both your pain and your fear. The patch takes that fear away because it is not a drug (As of this time!), that the DEA or any state is taking away from patients, doctor's, or pharmacies. I wish you well, and you will be in my thoughts and prayers.
  • 8 months ago

    RE: Chronic Pain

    First of all, I wish you well. I hope this will help you

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  • 8 months ago

    RE: Chronic Pain

    First of all, I wish you well. I hope this will help you

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      • 8 months ago
        Ahned. Thank you for the 2 websites. Both hit the nail on the head!!! I'll pass both of them on. To other people. That I know deal with Chronic Pain. I

        Chronic Pain is like a shadow. It comes and goes
  • 8 months ago

    RE: Chronic Pain

    Get well

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  • 8 months ago

    RE: Chronic Pain

    Get well

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  • 8 months ago

    RE: Chronic Pain

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  • 8 months ago

    RE: Chronic Pain

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