• 6 months ago

    Upset about the diagnosis of osteoporosis

    I just turned 72. Until last year, my bone density tests revealed osteopenia. Last year for the first time it revealed age related osteoporosis with some bone loss in my left hip...but not in my spine or right hip. My doctor wanted me to start on Boniva, but I decided to wait until my next test, which is coming up this Saturday. I am generally in good physical health. I am thin, exercise regularly and lead an active life style. I have decided that if the next test shows additional bone loss, I will start taking one of the recommended medications. Would like to hear from people who had had experiences with these meds. Thanks.
    Lorraine

Responses

  • 6 months ago

    RE: Upset about the diagnosis of osteoporosis

    Take the medicine. You won't recoup any bone lost and can maintain and strengthen what you have. It doesn't matter the scores in your right hip or spine. Diagnosis is given upon the lowest score. With the medication, be sure to consume 1200 mg of calcium taken in 600 mg increments. The medication won't work effectively without this. Get a supplement with Vit D and it sends the calcium to the bone.

    As for exercise. Walking is best - no running. No bending forward at the spine (toe touches, crunches, etc) and no side to side twisting of the spine. These weaken the small bones in the spine that cause minute fractures that you can't feel - until the last one in a vertebra breaks, then you have a no do-over compression fracture.

    As I tell everyone - go to the NOF website (www.nof.org) for the most reliable and up to date info on osteoporosis. They have very good sections on medication comparisons, body mechanics and diet. Also one on "natural cures."
  • 4 months ago

    RE: Upset about the diagnosis of osteoporosis

    Dear Lorraine (braidsl),
    Hello, my name is Amy and I am a second year Doctor of Physical Therapy student. I am sorry to hear about your diagnosis of osteoporosis. It sounds like you are concerned that this diagnosis will prevent you from doing the things you enjoy in life and from continuing your healthy, active lifestyle. While it is important to follow your doctor’s recommendations about medications to slow bone loss, you would likely also benefit from physical therapy in combination with your medications.
    As your doctor has likely informed you, osteoporosis puts you at increased risk for fractures, which can commonly occur from falls, bumps, or strenuous activity. While physical therapy is not a substitute for medications recommended by your physician, it can be a beneficial adjunct to help reduce your risk of fractures. In fact, a 2018 study by Rafiq examined the effects of treatment for osteoporosis using medication plus physical therapy compared to medication alone and found that women treated with medication plus physical therapy had a higher bone mineral density after treatment than the women treated with medication alone.1 A physical therapist can help you increase your strength, slow your bone loss, improve your balance to prevent falls, and teach you small adjustments you can make in your life to safely perform activities that you enjoy doing to maintain a high quality of life.
    A physical therapist will work with you to assess your current strength, movement patterns, and balance and develop a set of exercises specifically for you to help increase your strength, improve your balance, and slow the breakdown of bone to help reduce your risk of fractures. A physical therapist can also educate you on proper movement patterns to reduce undue stress on your body to make sure you can participate in the activities you enjoy safely for as long as possible. A physical therapist can also work with you to help improve your balance to reduce your risk of falls and associated fractures. If you would like more information on how physical therapy can help with osteoporosis, you can go to https://www.moveforwardpt.com/SymptomsConditionsDetail.aspx?cid=b5e09439-77a8-497d-b8d9-b5250de60544 . There is a section near the middle of the page labeled “How can a physical therapist help?” that can provide you with more information.
    While I am not sure what state you live in, all states have some form of direct access to physical therapy, meaning that you do not need to obtain a physician referral before seeing a physical therapist. If you would like help finding a physical therapist near you, you can use this link here. http://aptaapps.apta.org/findapt/SearchResults.aspx .
    I hope this post helps you and I wish you the best of luck.
    Sincerely,
    Amy, SPT

    1. Rafiq S, Zia S, Ijaz MJ, Shahid HA, Adeel M. Role of weight-bearing exercises in the treatment of post-menopausal osteoporosis. J Coll Physicians Surg Pak. 2018;28(2):122-125. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29394971 . Published February 2018. Accessed February 23, 2019.
  • 3 months ago

    RE: Upset about the diagnosis of osteoporosis

    My mother took the biophosphonates for years; it slowed and for a while stopped the progression of osteoporosis. Ultimately, she did a two-year injectable therapy of Forteo, which was also successful. I am 58 and at my next bone density it is very likely my hip joints will be in the osteoporosis category; I expect my spine to still be osteopenia. I cannot take the biophosphonates due to jaw surgery. I am working with an endocrinologist and am trying to get as much dietary calcium as I can. I need to exercise more; I figure the more muscle I have to hold up my bones the better! From watching my mom, I would say those medications were totally worth it. If you're a good candidate, go for it.