• 17 days ago

    Blood Pressure

    My blood pressure has been at Least 160/100 for the past 24 hours. I am a 25 year old male on several meds for anxiety and depression. I have this problem from 6 months. Should I be concerned

Responses

  • 16 days ago

    RE: Blood Pressure

    "Should I be concerned?"

    Yes, of course.

    Normal resting blood pressure (BP) in adults is under 120/80 with 115/75 or 110/70 considered as being optimal/ideal. Prehypertension is defined as systolic of 120-139 mmHg and diastolic of 80-89 mmHg. Stage 1 is systolic of 140 to 159 and diastolic of 90 to 99. Stage II is systolic of 160 to 179 and diastolic of 100 to 109. Stage III is systolic greater than 180 and diastolic greater than 110. Stage IV is systolic of 210 and greater, and diastolic of 120 and greater.

    Sometimes, high BP can suddenly become a "hypertensive crisis", which is described as when diastolic is greater than 120, and there are signs or symptoms of damage to the brain, heart, kidneys or other organs. If/when applicable, quick-acting drugs can be administered in the ER setting to reduce BP.

    Noteworthy, temporary increases or high spikes in BP, which was at one time was thought as being relatively harmless, can in fact be deleterious (may/can even cause a hypertensive brain attack) in some individuals, especially in those who already have hypertension or weakened arteries in the brain.



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