• 7 months ago

    What condition has pain in the throat that will spread down the esophagus if you do not drink something...will go away sooner or as soon as you drink something, hot or cold?

    I have occasional pain and tightness that starts usually, in my throat or the side of the throat and will spread down the esophagus or to the middle of the chest...but will go away when I drink something, hot or cold. I can not swallow as it won't go away...but if I drink, it will make it go away...not immediately but if I continue to drink until it goes away, it will go away. Doesn't usually take very long to get it to go away. I was just see by a cardiologist in the hospital but didn't get to ask him about this. He said that I do not have any obvious heart conditions or heart problems...all tests were good. I can not afford to see him again or I'd ask. I was told it might be a spasming esophagus years ago, but no test were done, it was never confirmed. If you look up the symptoms, they do not fit, not really. I rarely have reflux.

Responses

  • 7 months ago

    RE: What condition has pain in the throat that will spread down the esophagus if you do not drink something...will go away sooner or as soon as you drink something, hot or cold?

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