• 8 months ago

    Heart palpitations

    I'm an 21 year old woman, usually fit and well with no past medical history.
    When I was about 18, I had some investigations done including an ECG, blood tests and a 24 hour holter monitor for some palpitations and chest pain I was having.
    The cardiologist I saw told me there was nothing to worry about and that I was simply aware of my own heart beats. I was then discharged. The palpitations cleared up on their own eventually.

    Recently, as in within the last 2/3 months, I have noticed a return of my palpitations, but this time I am feeling a lot of skipped beats. There is no pain with these either.
    I'm reluctant to return to my GP with this, as last time I felt like a bit of an idiot! I'm a nurse myself, and from colleagues of mine taking my pulse, I know I can run irregular beats at times.

    Is this something I should see someone about or is it a waste of time? Thanks!

Responses

  • 8 months ago

    RE: Heart palpitations

    Hi:

    "I have noticed a return of my palpitations, but this time I am feeling a lot of skipped beats."

    I'm reluctant to return to my GP with this, as last time I felt like a bit of an idiot!

    Never feel that way when your body talks to you and tells you something is wrong, though sometimes the problem can be benign in nature.

    "Is this something I should see someone about or is it a waste of time?"

    Feel free to see a new doctor if only to get some peace of mind in the matter.

    As mentioned here often, the most common type of palpitations, premature ventricular contractions (PVCs, occurs even in many heart-healthy individuals), described that the heart is flip-flopping, jumping, pausing or stopping briefly (though it's actually not doing that), pounding, SKIPPING, thumping, or strong, hard, or forceful beats being felt in the chest, neck, throat, has various causes (cardiac and non-cardiac) or triggers.

    PVCs, are typically harmless, be it isolated (single), couplets (2-in-row), triplets (3-in-a-row) or salvos (short bursts of 3 or more in-a-row), bigeminy (occurring every other beat), trigeminy (occurring every third beat), quadrigeminy (occurring every fourth beat), etc., etc.

    However, the main problem or concern (even more so, much more emphasized for those with certain major or serious heart conditions) with PVCs is when sustained ventricular tachycardia (runs of PVCs over 30 seconds) occurs.

    Symptoms that may/can occur with PVCs includes none at all or chest pain/discomfort/pressure/tightness, difficulty breathing, lightheadedness or dizziness, and in uncommon to rare cases, near-syncope or syncope (temporary loss of consciousness, includes fainting and passing out).

    Take care,

    CardioStar*

    WebMD member (since 8/99)



    -

    -

    Be well-informed

    MedicineNet - We Bring Doctors' Knowledge to You

    Palpitations (PACs, PVCs)

    http://www.medicinenet.com/Palpitations/article.htm

    -

    Quote!

    "Be a questioning patient. TALK to your DOCTOR and ASK QUESTIONS. Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"

    - Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society

    .

    WebMD/WebMD forums DOES NOT provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.
  • 7 months ago

    RE: Heart palpitations

    I started having palpitations in 1980. Went to hospital and was given a beta blocker. But they continued to have them. Doctors said the same thing to me "don't worry you are ok. You just are more sensitive to your heartbeat". Well, that may have been but it continued for several years. I tried all kinds of meds. One drug was called ATENOLOL, A BETA BLOCKER. it did help but not enough. 25mg per day. Then I relocated to a different state and made an appointment. I was taking the right drug but not enough to help. He said to increase it to 50mg per day. Low and behold, it worked. By the way, my palpitations were PAC's. Premature atrial contractions. Not Pvc's. I hope this helps you.
  • 7 months ago

    RE: Heart palpitations

    i am not a Dr. but i feel the same thing at times and seen my heart Dr and gp, all of them had me do all types of tests and showed up nothing. i do get panic attacks now and then, when i seen my gp Dr. told him all my symptom and told me that it is panic attacks. gave me a kolopin to take when needed, well i take 1 in morning and 1 at night and so far no panic attacks. i used to get heart burn until i had a brava test done and showed up my Gaul bladder at 17% in which is now out and i feel great. good luck with your Heart palpitations, try to just ignore it and go on with what you are doing
  • 7 months ago

    RE: Heart palpitations

    YES, have a Cardo . No, you won't be wasting your time, be assured.
    If you are a floor nurse, should be one around to talk too. But, Talk to one no matter what.

    ( The cardiologist I saw told me there was nothing to worry about and that I was simply aware of my own heart beats. I was then discharged.) That statement he made is STUPID, Period..
    Sense you are have the problem again, Get a Event Monitor, and go from here, and find you a GOOD Cardiologist, the one that made the remark I put in Quotes WRONG.
    I am a 80 year old retired doc. So, I surely do not understand the comments these Dr. tell people today. Age is has nothing to do, with heart problems.

    Take care, good luck.
  • 7 months ago

    RE: Heart palpitations

    Hi. I was diagnosed with Supraventricular Tachicardia many years ago. I was on several different medications to help control it. As the years went by, it became worse with my heart rate climbing to 240 beats per minute. Finally I went to see the most wonderful doctor in the world and he performed a heart ablasion which took care of the problem. The doctor I suggest you see is a Cardiophysiologist, trained in heart rhythem problems. I saw 8 Cardiologists over the years and all they did was write me more prescriptions. If your heart has an electrical problem with palpitations, rapid heart beat, skip beats, etc. I would strongly encourage you to see that type of Cardiologist. Hope this helps.