Responses

  • 4 months ago

    RE: How to deal with bp meds

    Hi:

    ......" and hate the side effects of the tiredness"

    It is said that medicine is a science of uncertainty and an act of probability, and for many, prescription drug-therapy is a hit or miss, trial and error affair, especially since everyone is "medically" unique.

    Side effects/adverse reactions can not be predicted or pre-determined. If/when side effects occur, this may/can diminish or disappear as the body adjusts itself to the drug, though sometimes, one will simply not be able to tolerate a certain drug (or drugs) at all, at any dose.

    Factors and conditions such as age height, weight, gender, genetics and metabolism may/can come into play in determining who experiences side effects and who does not.

    Pharmacogenomics, the study of the interplay between genes and drugs, helps to explain why prescription drugs have different effects in different individuals. Genetic variation in one or more genes may be the basis for a therapeutic failure or for an adverse drug reaction.

    Without lowering the dosage (unless applicable), sometimes, taking a particular prescription drug at a different time of the day or taking it with food may/can improve the side effect-related situation.

    Sometimes, changing to another same-class drug or taking a lower dose of the drug along with another class of drug (for a combo-action) may/can impove the side effect-related situation.

    ALWAYS be proactive in your health care and treatment. Most important, communicate/interact well with your doctor(s).

    Take care,

    CardioStar*

    WebMD member (since 8/99)

    -

    -

    Be well-informed

    KNOW your prescription drugs and KNOW them WELL!

    WebMD

    Drugs A-Z

    http://www.webmd.com/drugs/index-drugs.aspx

    Ask A Patient

    Rate a drug, side effects, comments, etc.

    http://askapatient.com/rateyourmedicine.htm

    i
    .


    Quote!

    "Be a questioning patient. Talk to your doctor and ask questions. Studies show that patients who ask the most questions, and are most assertive, get the best results. Be vigilant and speak up!"

    - Charles Inlander, People's Medical Society

    .

    WebMD/WebMD forums does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment.

    WebMD does not endorse any specific product, service or treatment.
  • 3 months ago

    RE: How to deal with bp meds

    I note that you are taking a beta blocker. Typically they reduce one's pulse, sometimes below 60. At that point one should expect to feel tired. I had that problem and I was also having other side effects. Eventually I switched to a combination of calcium channel blockers and ace inhibitors and had excellent results without the fatigue.