Responses

  • 5 months ago

    RE: T2 info

    Your blood sugar will go up and not only will you feel bad, you will probably get complications eventually (blindness, kidney damage, heart attack, neuropathy, etc).
  • 5 months ago

    RE: T2 info

    This may have irreversible effects.
  • 3 months ago

    RE: T2 info

    I did that 20 years ago thinking that I knew better and I lost all my toes on my right foot. Not worth it.
  • 3 months ago

    RE: T2 info

    Read the following snippet from an article I found (especially the quotes from actual people with diabetes)

    What Nobody Tells You About Type 2 Diabetes

    If life with type 2 diabetes were easy, then nobody would be talking about it. But the truth is that explaining what you’re going through as you live your daily life with diabetes can be difficult, if not impossible at times. Still, that shouldn’t get you down. A recent survey shows that 1 in 8 Americans has type 2 diabetes. With that statistic in mind, here’s what a handful of others just like you think about what they’re going through, and what they long for others to know about it too.

    "Sometimes, no matter how hard we try to make all the right choices and maintain our health, the disease just wins anyway and gets the best of us, even on our best days. But not every day is bad, which makes the good days really sweet (no pun intended) and worth the fight."
    -ADNEV JO, LIVING WITH DIABETES

    "Even though we don’t look sick, we are."
    -JOSE GUZMAN, LIVING WITH DIABETES

    "My life has become a terrifying place to be. I fall without warning, and can’t get up without assistance. I didn’t take care of myself when I had the chance, and now I may never have the full use of my feet. I danced for 16 years, from the age of 3 until I was 19 — Indian classical (Bharatanatyam), Bollywood, jazz, hip-hop, and it was amazing. I may never do that again."
    -SONA SANGHVI, LIVING WITH DIABETES

    "I am sure that one day I will look back at all that I have accomplished and think that it wasn’t too hard. Hell, I look back now at where I am and where I was and think that it wasn’t difficult. But the truth is that each step of the way feels difficult as we move forward into the unknown of our mission: the unknown knowledge, the unknown endurance, and the unknown strength that we possess inside ourselves waiting to come out. I have beat the smoking habit, I will beat diabetes, and I will arrive one day completely debt free. For this is my mission."
    -BILLY, LIVING WITH DIABETES AND BLOGGER OF SIMPLE LIVING OVER 50

    "It’s not only about following orders, or fulfilling requirements. The emotional component of diabetes makes it way more complicated than that."
    -BEA SPARKS, LIVING WITH DIABETES AND BLOGGER AT THE TYPE 2 EXPERIENCE

    So, to answer your question ("What happens to a person who has type two diabetes if they stop taking their meds?"), It depends on who you are, does it not?
    Are you ADNEV JO, JOSE GUZMAN, SONA SANGHVI, BILLY or, BEA SPARKS?

    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The key quote that applies to you is "Billy's":
    "...But the truth is that each step of the way feels difficult as we move forward into the unknown of our mission..."

    I can tell you what happened to me when I told my doctor, "No. I don't plan on taking metformin for my Type 2 Diabetes." She gave me a choice. You need to do one of two things: A. You need to start taking diabetes drugs that I recommend, or, B. You need to lose weight (44 lbs) through diet, exercise and taking better care of yourself.

    I chose, B. That was over 12 years ago. I have never had a A1C test, since that time, higher than 5.6 (its currently 5.1).

    Type 2 Diabetes is not a mystery to me, anymore. Its not an unknown. Its not something to fear. That's because I studied the disease and removed the mystery. I learned about insulin resistance, how the aging process accelerates it, how diet and exercise can slow and even "reverse" Type 2 Diabetes. And, how my Type 2 Diabetes was fueled by stress and sleep apnea like gasoline to flame.

    All the quotes, above, are by people who live in doubt. They don't know what's going to happen, next. Since, they don't understand how Type 2 Diabetes works, they have no way of determining whether they are getting better or getting worse. All they know is their "sick".

    The only person who has a "chance" is "Billy". He's committed to asking questions and finding answers. He's determined to become "educated" about Type 2 Diabetes. And, the more you study and learn, the picture becomes clearer and clearer: "You don't TREAT diabetes (especially with drugs)! You re-tool your body, get it back in tip-top shape, and blood glucose levels normalize, automatically."

    So, to answer your question, it depends entirely on who you are. If you stop taking metformin on a wing and a prayer, I'd say you're a damn fool. But, if you're determined (like Billy and me) to remove the "mystery & fear" from the T2 Diabetes equation and "work the problem" just like any other problem, I'd say, "Good for you! You're on the right track to never having to worry about this disease, again".

    There's only one person qualified in this world to answer your question. Hint: It aint your doc and it sure in hell aint anybody on this board, that's for sure!