• over 2 years ago

    Glucose levels for someone 70 years old

    My Doctor has told me I should not worry about higher sugar levels at my age. He said I should keep them above 100 at all times, so I do not fall and break a bone. This makes no sense to me, and seems rather condescending. Is there any reason why I should not try to maintain blood sugar levels in a healthy range of 90-100 after fasting, and after exercising?

Responses

  • over 2 years ago

    RE: Glucose levels for someone 70 years old

    This advice is based on some studies that examined intensive diabetes treatments in older people. The bottom line is that if you are on meds (orals or insulin) that can make you go low, as you age the potential side effects of severe lows can be considerably worse. This includes heart issues as well as falls and accompanying bone breaks.

    So if you are not on medications that will make you go low, there really isn't any need to counter act your body's natural ability to keep you in the 100s range. If, though, you are on insulin or something that forces your pancreas to produce more insulin, then you are putting yourself at higher risk for a coronary event when you go low.

    That's probably where your doctor is coming from.
      • over 2 years ago
        I think the original post-er was questioning the doctor's connection between blood sugar below 100 and broken bones. I, too, would like to learn about that connection.
  • over 2 years ago

    RE: Glucose levels for someone 70 years old

    It makes no sense to you because there is "NO" correlation between higher blood sugar levels and "stronger" bones. In fact, it's the opposite. The higher your blood sugar (aka, insulin resistance, aka, Type 2 Diabetes), the weaker your bones become. Just google, "correlation between osteoporosis and Type 2 Diabetes" (ie. insulin resistance).

    Now, it is true, that with increasing age, blood pressure, serum cholesterol, blood sugar and body weight slightly increase, too. Let me ask you, do you think you should be taking blood pressure meds at age 70 if you show B.P. readings in the 130's , low 140's? I bet you do...even, though, that would be "normal" B.P. for a 70 year old.

    My father was on insulin and he was told that keeping his blood sugar levels slightly high (120's) was "OK" because, even back in the day, most physicians were fearful of raising insulin dosage too quickly. They knew, insulin injections were the last "line of defense" (for T2D) & once the effectiveness of insulin began to wane, you were up the proverbial "creek" without a paddle.

    imo, direct injections of insulin, though it reduces high blood pressure, it "fuels" insulin resistance. In other words, it places your boat upstream from the falls. Instead of increasing the dose of insulin, I'd start paddling. Treat insulin with extreme caution and try to use the least amount by eating, right, and getting plenty of rest and exercise.
  • over 2 years ago

    RE: Glucose levels for someone 70 years old

    I assume he is worried about fainting from low blood sugars and the falls that might cause.
  • RE: Glucose levels for someone 70 years old

    You confused me. I don't know now, is it ok for my grandmother to take insulin whenever her sugars are high or no, because of some side effects? Her doctor recommended us to buy her an insulin cooler, so that she could have it always next to her. It's a tiny but very precious box that she keeps under her bed.
    At her age there aren't many alternatives to lower the glucose levels naturally. Contradict me if I'm wrong, but isn't insulin the only remedy?
    For someone searching for insulin coolers, we found ours on https://bestinsulincooler.com/.
      • 1 month ago
        Some insulin in a senior is fine. What the doctors are worried about is the current push for "intensive diabetes management" which is what they do with kids and 'regular' adults.

        When you work to get near normal glucose levels in someone not a senior, this is a good thing. More normal glucose levels will help decrease the risk of complications (kidneys, eyes, nerves) decades down the road.

        In someone of advanced age, there are considerably more risks involved in this intensive course of therapy. On the one hand, fainting from a low can cause bone breaks (especially hips) and this can become fatal in a senior. Additionally, frequent lows from very intensive therapy can also cause cardiac events in seniors. And finally, why put in all that work to keep your numbers down when the odds of living another 20 or 30 years (to see the start of complications) are pretty small.

        So they don't want outrageous high glucose levels, but trying to get to 'normal' levels is really not worth the effort for anyone when it is for a person of advanced years.
      • 1 month ago
        @ rochellealbino For your grandma, insulin usage "depends"...

        for example, it depends on if she's using insulin in combination with other oral diabetes medication(s). Insulin treatment can be greatly affected by other comorbidities (dementia, heart disease, vision impairment, digestive disorders, auto immune conditions, etc, etc, etc...) and the drugs used to control them. It depends on the status of your grandma's kidneys, especially.

        I understand why you're confused. But, without DETAILED and SPECIFIC information regarding your grandma's medical history, it's impossible for anyone, here, to address the insulin needs required in managing your grandma's blood glucose levels. In essence, you're asking us to drive you to the corner store, blindfolded.


        Diabetes is a complex condition that's affected by a multitude of factors. Plus, consider the following:

        "...insulin administration in the older population is associated with a greater possibility of "dosing errors". Not only is insulin administration complex, but visual and physical disabilities in older patients (eg, visual impairment, joint immobility, and peripheral neuropathy) contribute to inaccurate dosing. Studies have demonstrated that patients who use the traditional vial and syringe method of insulin delivery experience a relative error rate of about 19% with regard to accuracy of dosing; this rate can be even higher in the older population..." (...yikes!)

        So many variables to consider. I can drive blindfolded. But, I can't guarantee I won't kill somebody in the process. Thus, the best advice in your grandma's situation: Just let her doctor do the driving for, now.
  • 1 month ago

    RE: Glucose levels for someone 70 years old

    Hello it sound's strange to me also... If I was you, I'd still try to watch my diet, exercise, and blood sugar levels. I'm not a doctor, but I don't think it matters how old you are, if you have diabetes, you should monitor all, to keep your diabetes in check. and 70 isn't that old. Hope this helps, and good luck!