• over 3 years ago

    Preschooler starts crying about falling

    My preschooler will be playing on the ground and then will start crying hysterically about falling. In today's episode, he was almost inconsolable and kept telling me "The house is falling! The house is falling!" He's not at all a cuddly boy, but when he has these episodes, he's in my arms for a good half hour or so. Any leads on what I can do for this little guy? Is it his eyes? Something going on in his brain?

Responses

  • over 3 years ago

    RE: Preschooler starts crying about falling

    Does your son describe it as things look like they are falling or as the feeling that he is falling? Could it be dizziness? Does it only happen when he is on the ground? Does it seem to happen more after an event like a loud noise or after he's had a meal?

    The best first step that you can take is to take your son to see your pediatrician. A medical professional is the only person who is able to properly diagnose what is causing these symptoms. After an exam and listening to your descriptions of past episodes your son has had, his doctor will hopefully have an idea of what is going on.

    It's possible that it could have something to do with his eyes -- or even inner ear and balance -- as you suggested, could be anxiety related, or could be something else going on in his body or in his mind. Your son's doctor really is the best person to determine what is going on.

    Please check back in and let us know how he's doing!
  • over 3 years ago

    RE: Preschooler starts crying about falling

    Hi there and thanks for posting,

    Have your child or your family unit undergone any changes recently? According to this article ( http://wb.md/2crv0IY) , an infant/toddler's world is framed by parental security and a sense of calm, so a disruption in that framing could be causing your child to act out. During their preschool years, their worlds are expanding, and that can bring fears of uncertainty. The aforementioned article also states that their imaginations are forming, which might be the reason why he has developed a fear of something seemingly unlikely. Perhaps, one of the most important pieces of information in the article is: Don't always assume that you know the precise source of your child's fear.

    I would definitely speak to a child psychologist and express your concerns. These episodes could be a sign of natural development but it could also be representative of an underlying issue. It's always better to be safe than sorry when it comes to your children.

    Please come back and let us know how you and your son are doing.