• 5 months ago

    Still worried

    Dear Doctors,

    More than 6 months ago I had a possible HIV exposure. According to the tests, I am not infected (5, 12, 22, 26 weeks, negative). I am asking you what are the odds that the results to be false negative? Can the co-infection with other STI or HCV delay beyond 6 months the seroconversion? What other medical conditions can do that? I am not on drugs, I am not aware of any immune condition. I had an undetectable result by RT-PCR HIV 1 RNA at 52 day after the moment of risk. I had a lot of symptoms that people associate with ARS.
    It is possible a wrong manipulation of the blood samples or wrong settings of the kit to lead to false negative results?
    Thank you!

Responses

  • 5 months ago

    RE: Still worried

    "I am asking you what are the odds that the results to be false negative?"
    Zero. Especially with any test done after 12 weeks.

    There was no wrong manipulation of the blood sample or wrong setting of the test kit.

    False negative results occur when folks test too early; before there are enough antibodies present to be picked up by current testing methods. This would occur is someone tested just days after transmission.

    Look at it this way; by 25 days post transmission, 95 percent of newly infected folks would have enough antibodies present to have a "reactive" (positive) test result. So why would you question your tests taken at 5, 12, 22 and 26 weeks. If infected they certainly would have come back as "reactive" (positive). They didn't. You are HIV negative. Accept this good news and put your concern of HIV behind you.

    gail
  • 5 months ago

    RE: Still worried

    "I am asking you what are the odds that the results to be false negative?"
    Zero. Especially with any test done after 12 weeks.

    There was no wrong manipulation of the blood sample or wrong setting of the test kit.

    False negative results occur when folks test too early; before there are enough antibodies present to be picked up by current testing methods. This would occur is someone tested just days after transmission.

    Look at it this way; by 25 days post transmission, 95 percent of newly infected folks would have enough antibodies present to have a "reactive" (positive) test result. So why would you question your tests taken at 5, 12, 22 and 26 weeks. If infected they certainly would have come back as "reactive" (positive). They didn't. You are HIV negative. Accept this good news and put your concern of HIV behind you.

    gail