• 10 days ago

    Heart palpitations

    I'm an 21 year old woman, usually fit and well with no past medical history.
    When I was about 18, I had some investigations done including an ECG, blood tests and a 24 hour holter monitor for some palpitations and chest pain I was having.
    The cardiologist I saw told me there was nothing to worry about and that I was simply aware of my own heart beats. I was then discharged. The palpitations cleared up on their own eventually.

    Recently, as in within the last 2/3 months, I have noticed a return of my palpitations, but this time I am feeling a lot of skipped beats. There is no pain with these either.
    I'm reluctant to return to my GP with this, as last time I felt like a bit of an idiot! I'm a nurse myself, and from colleagues of mine taking my pulse, I know I can run irregular beats at times.

    Is this something I should see someone about or is it a waste of time? Thanks!

Responses

  • RE: Heart palpitations

    Hi:

    "I have noticed a return of my palpitations, but this time I am feeling a lot of skipped beats."

    I'm reluctant to return to my GP with this, as last time I felt like a bit of an idiot!

    Never feel that way when your body talks to you and tells you something is wrong, though sometimes the problem can be benign in nature.

    "Is this something I should see someone about or is it a waste of time?"

    Feel free to see a new doctor if only to get some peace of mind in the matter.

    As mentioned here often, the most common type of palpitations, premature ventricular contractions (PVCs, occurs even in many heart-healthy individuals), described that the heart is flip-flopping, jumping, pausing or stopping briefly (though it's actually not doing that), pounding, SKIPPING, thumping, or strong, hard, or forceful beats being felt in the chest, neck, throat, has various causes (cardiac and non-cardiac) or triggers.

    PVCs, are typically harmless, be it isolated (single), couplets (2-in-row), triplets (3-in-a-row) or salvos (short bursts of 3 or more in-a-row), bigeminy (occurring every other beat), trigeminy (occurring every third beat), quadrigeminy (occurring every fourth beat), etc., etc.

    However, the main problem or concern (even more so, much more emphasized for those with certain major or serious heart conditions) with PVCs is when sustained ventricular tachycardia (runs of PVCs over 30 seconds) occurs.

    Symptoms that may/can occur with PVCs includes none at all or chest pain/discomfort/pressure/tightness, difficulty breathing, lightheadedness or dizziness, and in uncommon to rare cases, near-syncope or syncope (temporary loss of consciousness, includes fainting and passing out).

    Take care,

    CardioStar*

    WebMD member (since 8/99)



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