• 2 months ago

    AFib back day after cardio conversion; bpm averaging 130 bpm

    Had my 2nd cardio conversion in 6 mos done last Thur. Was back in AFib after 26 hours (after showering, dressing and picking up house). BPM shot to 176/back in Afib. Went to concert; walked couple of blocks and back. Was out of breath; bpm was never lower than 120 bpm, usually higher. Now Sat nite-my Kardia ekg device shows me as "unclassified" due to bpm being high or in Afib. How long can I go w high bpm and Afib? Do I go to Emergency Room or contact electro doc on Monday? Doc talked about ablation or maze procedure to eliminate going into Afib so often. Tx.

Responses

  • 2 months ago

    RE: AFib back day after cardio conversion; bpm averaging 130 bpm

    Hi:

    "How long can I go w high bpm and Afib?"

    That can not be properly addressed/anwered here.

    "Do I go to Emergency Room or contact electro doc on Monday?"

    Your choice, as medical advice/directives can not be given here.

    About AF

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) or a-fib may/can come and go, or be chronic. As reported, atrial fibrillation (which has various causes, associated with many cardiac conditons) is an independent risk factor for a brain attack/stroke (increasing the risk about 5-fold), and significantly increases all-cause mortality in most age groups.

    Additionally, some individuals with AF are at an increased risk of heart failure or cardiomyopathy (heart muscle disease) or a worsening thereof in those with pre-existing heart failure and/or cardiomyopathy.

    There are a small % of individuals in which a reversible cause for AF can be readily identified, e.g., alcoholism, hyperthyroidism, or diabetes, and thus AF does not recur once the cause has been alleviated.

    Goals for managing those with AF are to restore and maintain the normal atrial rhythm and pumping function, control the ventricular rate, prevent any correlating major adverse coronary event (MACE).

    AF Management:

    Correct any electrolyte imbalance/defficiency, in particular, potassium and magnesium. Consider cardioversion (externally shocking the heart back into normal sinus rhythm, which may/can fail). Control the ventricular response. Anticoagulation therapy.

    Take care,

    CardioStar*

    WebMD member (since 8/99)