• 10 months ago

    Type 2 diabetes and methadone withdrawal

    Hi, I was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes around 7 yrs ago. I take both oral medication along with insulin injections. My sugars still arent controlled and still are way to high. I have also been in the methadone clinic for about 4 yrs now. Before that I was a patient at a local pain clinic where my addiction was started and was there forabout 6 1/2 yrs. It is along time to be on methadone. Almost 2 weeks ago my husband was in a car accident which left him with 2 breaks in his wrist. Unfortunately this has put him out of work which means we cannot afford to continue to go to the clinic. Starting Monday we both will start being financially detoxed which means that we will decrease our doses at a rate of 5 milligrams a day. I am scared of the detox part alone but wonder if anyone can tell me how this will affect my diabetes and if I may be in any sort of physical danger because of the diabetes? If anyone out there can help me to know if this is something I should really be concerned about? I have been told that I need to go through a medical detox but not only is there none around me that do medical detoxes but I couldnt afford it even if they did. I am very scared and desperately need some advise. Please and thank you

Responses

  • 10 months ago

    RE: Type 2 diabetes and methadone withdrawal

    Stress and worry, financial stress, emotional stress, poor sleep, inflammation due to drug exposure, misconception, misinformation, relying on information from others with diabetes...

    All of these can and do raise your blood sugar.

    Your question implies that methadone helps control your diabetes when you readily admit that you've experienced poor control since diagnosis. Explain that, please. How does methadone help control your diabetes?

    Diabetes is a health condition. How does stress of any kind, and drugs of any kind improve your health? Now that I've answered your question, I have one of my own. What things can you do to improve your health (thus, improve your diabetes) that cost little to no money, at all?
      • 10 months ago
        I am sorry if my question was not clear. I know they aren't connected. I am both a diabetic as well as an addict who will start the detox process from methadone. I try 2 do what I can to help control my diabetes. I have been told that I should be eating many small meals with the right foods to help regulate my sugars and keep my sugars from spiking in either direction. Well, when I am in the detox process I will be barely able to drink water to try to stay hyrated. I can't eat when I am nauseaus and if I can't eat they way I should be, I want to know if I should be concerned that something bad might happen to me once my sugar levels become more out of wack. Also the dr.'s are the ones working on the correct combination of oral meds and insulin. She, my dr, has been altering my dosage since I was initially prescribed the insulin which honestly hasn't been prescribed since my diagnoses. Hope this helps clarify any confusion
      • 10 months ago
        Thanks for your response. Eat as healthy as you can. Drink water, only, and drink as much as your body needs. Get as much sleep as your body needs with an emphasis on "limiting" stress and worry. These are common sense health advice that have been passed from generation to generation for a million years. Please don't think the book on recovery and repair needs to be rewritten.

        I hope and pray you will be drug free, someday...Good luck and do the very best that you are able.
      • Hey Brunosbud, you should be banned from this site. You don't bother to read the question (you claim the poster states she uses methadone to manage her diabetes). Second, you automatically assume a methadone patient is a drug addict. You represent exactly what is wrong with society. I'm a Ph.D. in engineering, never touched a drug in my life, yet I've been on ultra-high dose methadone for several years. In your words, how do you explain that? Lastly, as a cancer survivor, I can say that opiate withdrawal is over a dozen times worse than the worse round of chemo sickness I've ever felt. So, all that being said, close your account before your complete stupidity ends up killing somebody!
      • 30 days ago
        Hello ottawaengineer and welcome to this thread. I am impressed with your credentials and congratulations on surviving cancer! I wish you and your family good health for years to come!

        I get the sense you're not happy about my reply.lol

        That's fine; You're not the first, here, to voice displeasure with my posts. The issue are, insulin usage and blood sugar management. The poster has requested assistance on how to bring her numbers down but she's on a very tight budget. So, without further adieu, please. Do your best (as I have) to help "her". Enlighten us...
  • 10 months ago

    RE: Type 2 diabetes and methadone withdrawal

    Jada, what type of insulin do you use? Many times it takes adjustments in dosaging over a period of time. Along with using insulin, of course, you still need to watch your intake of food carefully, keeping in balance your proteins, carbs and fats.

    I use two insulins to keep my blood sugar in control. ALSO, diet and physical activity along with insulin injections help even further with blood sugar control. Doing all three can bring your blood glucose numbers toward normal.

    I use a 24-hour acting insulin along with a rapid-acting insulin for meals. My body has a very low tolerance for carbohydrates. My insulin dosages were constantly adjusted in the beginning. Doctors tend to be on the conservative side when dealing with insulin. I had a very high A1C when diagnosed at 13.2. I managed to get it down to 5.6 with the proper dosage of insulin, diet and exercise/physical activity. It's important to remember that ALL three of these things are important in bringing your blood glucose under control.

    If you can, talk with a doctor regarding your insulin dosaging. I don't know where you live, but applying for state aid for health benefits might be able to help you out.